Chaotic Brain, Obligatory Top “Fives”

Recently on Facebook, there has been a rash of users posting applications like “Albums that have shaped me,” or “Albums that have changed my life.”   Now, I’ll start off by saying that lists and rankings such as the classic “Top Five Desert Island Albums” have always presented something of a challenge for me.  Current top five?  Can’t do it.  My music-listening habits of the last four years have been so incredibly fractured that I’d be hard-pressed to make a cohesive list that reflects my current aesthetic.  There’s one or two records I’ve listened to consistently (Frengers and And the Glass-Handed Kites, both by Danish band Mew), and a handful of records that I like in the most casual of ways (In Ear Park by Department of Eagles, TV on the Radio’s Dear Science, even a would-be fascination with Pinback’s Rob Crow and his various projects).  But five solid choices?  And what about top five of all time?  Can’t do that either.  There was a time in my life, say about six or seven years ago, when I was dead certain that there were four or six(never five!)  perfect records (with staying power, no less) I could name on demand.

Because of the aforementioned difficulties, I actually find the “Albums that have shaped my life” to be a more comforting format for sharing my “top” records. It’s easier to talk about, to quantify.  The albums either had a profound effect on me, or they didn’t — and that’s something that will never change.  I will impose no limits on number.  There will probably be more than five but less than ten.  Who knows?

 Criteria include 1) an album I can listen to in full, without skipping a track (or at least no more than two tracks), 2) an album that remained a favorite for a significant period of time, and 3) one that possibly changed the way I thought about music altogether.

So without further ado, and in no particular order (the numbers are a formality):

1. Either/Or by Elliott Smith

2. Under the Pink, Tori Amos

3. Post, Bjork

4. To Bring You My Love, PJ Harvey

5. One Part Lullaby, The Folk Implosion

6. III, Sebadoh

7. If You’re Feeling Sinister, Belle & Sebastian

 

This list is not at all surprising if you consider that they reflect my adolescent period, the time when we are all a little more sensitive to pop culture and absorbed the trends of the time, possibly internalizing them for life.  I discovered all of these albums when I was between the ages of 13 and 19, years 1994-2000.

These choices don’t necessarily reflect current tastes; I almost never listen to Tori Amos anymore (unless I need something I can sing along with on a long drive), and although I still enjoy Bjork’s earlier albums, most of her work after Vespertine doesn’t interest me much.  On the other hand, I am Lou Barlow’s girl always and forever. True, he has a 75-25% “unlistenable crap” to “brilliance” ratio, but I will always wade through the 75% of crap to get to the gems.  Belle & Sebastian will always be welcome in my stereo and my iPod (although not in my car — more on that later!).

In the next few posts, I’ll explore a handful of these essential albums/artists and the subsequent obsessions they spawned in a more thorough fashion.  Until then, toodles.

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About Candice

I like horror movies, poetry, and weird things. ATX

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