Mother Suspiria Jumped the Gun: 31 Days of Horror

Make-Out With Violence

It’s October, which means I’ve been watching horror movies almost non-stop for the last three weeks.  In fact, I think my Netflix account is starting to judge me a little, each day coming closer to the conclusion that I’m a psychopath.  Everyone’s familiar with horror tropes by now, but those genre conventions are brought into even sharper relief when you watch movies back to back to back.  I’ve put together a few suggested double features based on the noticeable parallels.

 

The “She’s a Real Sweet Girl” Double Feature: May and Audition

The female leads in both films are shy, sweet, soft spoken, and endearingly off-kilter.  But you’d better run like hell, because they have a penchant for dismemberment.

 

The “Location, Location, Location” Double Feature: Session 9 and The Descent

The Danvers State Mental Hospital in Session 9 and the caverns in The Descent are both monsters in their own right, even before the spooky shit starts to happen.  The characters, already damaged by personal trauma, begin to unravel in claustrophobic spaces.  The Descent throws in literal monsters for good measure, but both films have a haunted, melancholy atmosphere that would have been frightening enough without things that go bump in the night.

 

The “You’re Not From Around Here” Double Feature: Don’t Look Now and The Wicker Man

Donald Sutherland and Edward Woodward both search frantically for a lost little girl (one dead, the other imaginary) in unfamiliar places (Venice/Summerisle).  Stymied at every turn by creepy old ladies and local authorities, they struggle to take power into their own hands.  Little do they know that a mysterious plot is tightening its noose around them. See also: Antichrist vs. Don’t Look Now.  Explicit married sex.  Death of a child. Restorative vacation turned destructive.

 

The “Let’s Go to the Mall” Double Feature: Return of the Living Dead and Night of the Comet

Teenagers! 80s Music! 80s Fashion! Talking Zombies! The government ruins everything! See also: Dawn of the Dead.

 

The “My Girlfriend is a Corpse” Double Feature: Deadgirl and Make-Out with Violence

Make-Out with Violence is a much sweeter and more subdued film, but both are twisted coming of age tales about teenage boys and their friendships.  Plus an undead girl tied to the bed.  Deadgirl seems to be about impotence (or misogyny, or something), while Make-Out with Violence is more about coping with grief, but both films are creepy parables about playing house with a girl too zonked to even participate in the relationship.  See also: Doghouse vs. Deadgirl, on the zombie chauvinism front.  Alternately, Lake Mungo vs. Make-Out with Violence, from the “ghosts and zombies are a metaphor for not letting go of loved ones” angle.

 

The “Shit’s All Freaky” Double Feature: Poltergeist and Insidious

Haunted houses.  Creepy children. Malevolent spirits.  Objects that move around by themselves.  Alternate dimensions.  Psychics and hapless ghost hunters.  Insidious even features a subtle homage to Poltergeist when one of the embattled ghost hunters soothes his bruises with a steak to the face.  Sadly, the steak does not crawl across the table. See also: House of the Devil, another straight-faced modern film with a loving callback to spooky 80s movies.

 

The “Vampires Are So 2010” Double Feature: Cronos and Thirst

Two directors known for daring and originality: Guillermo Del Toro and Chan-Wook Park (Oldboy).  Two takes on vampire mythology so radical that the classic creatures of the night are barely even recognizable.

 

Here are the other movies I’ve watched in the last few weeks, even though I couldn’t quite pair them up for an effective double feature:

Dario Argento’s Inferno (probably best with any other Argento film, especially Suspiria)

Peeping Tom (pair with another moody classic, like Eyes Without a Face, Diabolique, or something by Hitchcock)

Red State

Frozen

Them (suggested with atmospheric European thrillers, like The Vanishing or another home invasion story, The Strangers.)

 

October isn’t over yet.  More to come.

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About Candice

I like horror movies, poetry, and weird things. ATX

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