J.S.A. Review: In Which Zombette Learns Some History and Praises Song Kang-ho

Song Kang-ho (left) and Lee Byung-hun (right) in J.S.A.

I hadn’t previously known much about the Korean Demilitarized Zone beyond the fact that there was one neutral area where North Korea and South Korea could meet occasionally for negotiations.  The DMZ is a heavily-guarded buffer zone, a no-man’s land, that creates the boundary between North and South, and the Joint Security Area is the only spot where the two states come together.  According to Wikipedia, the Joint Security Area is only 2600 feet wide, and once upon a time, the agents of both North and South were allowed to move freely within this neutral area.  However, the Military Demarcation Line (the real border) was eventually enforced even within the JSA.  There is an actual line on the ground where North Korea and South Korea meet, and representatives from each side are not allowed to step over the line.

Park Chan-wook’s 2000 film J.S.A. (Joint Security Area) comments on the strangeness of this arrangement and the humanitarian conundrum it presents.  Soldiers in charge of guarding the area live in the border houses on each side, living, working, and sleeping within mere feet of their enemies but never able to breach the line.  Day after day, they stare at each other across the concrete slab on the ground that separates the states.  There isn’t even a wall or a fence, just a line that is, almost literally, drawn in the sand.  When representatives of each state need to speak to each other, they sit at opposite sides of a table – one half in North Korea, the other half in the South.  The only people allowed to straddle the line and move from one side of the table to the other hail from neutral Switzerland.  In one of the movie’s more affecting scenes, a soldier who attempts to cross over actually trips on the line as if it is a real, physical barrier.  Such is the power of symbolism.

In the beginning of the film, Swiss agents of the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission are called in to investigate a shooting at the North Korean border house that left two soldiers from the North dead and another wounded.  They already know who did it —  a South Korean border soldier named Soo-hyeok – but they want to understand how and why the incident occurred.  Both sides claim a grievance against the other: according to the survivor from the North, Kyeong-pil (played by the excellent Song Kang-ho), Soo-hyeok broke into the border house and shot the other soldiers without provocation, but according to Soo-hyeok, the Northern soldiers abducted him and he was forced to defend himself.

(SPOILERS AHEAD — scroll down to skip)

But Park doesn’t drag out the ambiguity over who is telling the truth; the middle of the film focuses on the real story, shown through an extended flashback sequence.  As it turns out, two of the North Korean soldiers involved in the shooting had become friends with Soo-hyeok after they rescued him from a mine-field.  The South Korean solider, along with his friend and fellow guard Sung-shik, would sneak over the border at night for some extreme male bonding time with their frenemies.  The developing friendship among the four men is shown in a touching and funny montage: they drink, play cards, arm-wrestle, share photos of their girlfriends, and teach each other how to shine their shoes.  The nighttime becomes a neutral zone where national loyalty is trumped by bromance.  One of the soldiers wonders aloud why the conflict between the two states should separate men from their own blood.  They call each other “comrade” and “brother.”  During the work day, they stand toe-to-toe and pretend to glare, spitting at each other across the line in a silly contest of one-upsmanship.

As we already know, this idyllic arrangement soon comes to a bloody end.  A commanding officer discovers the two South Korean soldiers in the North Korean border house and in a moment of confusion, betrayal, and panic, a shootout leaves the commanding officer and one of the friendly soldiers dead.  Sung-shik escapes and manages to keep his involvement a secret from the investigation for a little while, but Soo-hyeok, who was wounded in the shooting, is captured and taken into custody by the South.

(END SPOILERS)

J.S.A. is the kind of movie that would be called Oscar-bait in America (and it would probably be directed by Steven Spielberg).  The way it depicts soldiers overcoming their ideological and political differences to become friends, risking their jobs and possibly their lives for treasonous actions, is the kind of emotionally manipulative filmmaking that wins awards.  And indeed, J.S.A. at the time was one of the most popular films in Korea and won lots and lots of awards.  This is also the film that solidified Park’s credentials as a director to watch.  J.S.A. doesn’t have the same kind of visual panache that he would cultivate in his later films, but the movie is still technically strong; every frame is beautifully composed and the violence, although it occurs less frequently than in his Vengeance Trilogy, is rendered with unflinching brutality.

The movie also features a couple of great actors, the very handsome Lee Byung-hun (who plays Soo-hyeok) and Song Kang-ho, who have both gone on to be big stars in other films.  More recently, I’ve seen Lee in 2010’s I Saw the Devil and in The Good, the Bad, the Weird, where he stars alongside Song again.  Song, one of the most successful actors in South Korean cinema, has quickly become a favorite for me.  I like it when I’ve seen enough of a foreign country’s films to start recognizing familiar faces and Song’s presence is always welcome.  He’s a versatile performer who excels at both comedy and drama, bringing a sliver of warmth to the cruelest characters (Antarctic Journal) and bringing dignity to the silliest buffoons (Secret Sunshine).  It’s easy to see why he’s become such a staple for two of Korea’s leading directors, Park (in addition to J.S.A., Song appears in Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance and Thirst) and Bong Joon-ho (Memories of Murder, The Host, and the upcoming Snow Piercer).  In J.S.A., his character appears menacing at first, a gruff bad-guy “commie bastard” North Korean, but he is slowly revealed to be cool-headed (not cold-hearted), thoughtful, affable, and steadfast.

Alas, until Stoker is released next year, I’m out of Park Chan-wook films to watch.  And it will be a sad day when I’ve run out of movies starring Song.  That day is approaching way too fast.

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About Candice

I like horror movies, poetry, and weird things. ATX

4 responses to “J.S.A. Review: In Which Zombette Learns Some History and Praises Song Kang-ho”

  1. Charles Torello says :

    Though I do not claim to be an authority on North and South Korean relations, I have read that the UNITED STATES has a vested interest to keep the divide between North and South, as a pretext to maintain a military presence in the South. It makes sense to me.

    Regardless, I must say that your interest in the Korean movies makes me wonder how a people I know very little about see reality.

    • Candice says :

      The title card at the beginning of the film does explain that South Korea is/was backed by the US while North Korea was allied with the Soviet Union, the whole Cold War thing. You might like this movie. The whole point is that it questions that “reality.”

  2. Ellie says :

    I know nothing about any of these films, but I am enjoying reading your posts about them. If I had time to watch, I think I’d like this one the best – it sounds like it has historical/cultural stuff I would enjoy.

    • Candice says :

      I’m trying to pitch these posts to people who don’t know much about Korean movies, since I realize they will be obscure to most people… I’m a newbie myself, so it’s kind of fun. And I’m thinking about doing war/political movies this week/weekend.

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